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calming pastes?

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ornerie
Reg. Sep 2010
Posted 2011-07-15 12:21 PM (#135667)
Subject: calming pastes?



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does anyone have any advice, pro or con on the use of calming pastes on their horses when they travel?

I'm noticing my old guy is getting more and more herd bound (I'm told thats normal as they age and become a 'weaker link') and while he is still super as long as he's working, when I put him back in his paddock on weekend trips out, there is much pony weeping and waleing and gnashing of teeth. he then spends all night sobbing into his proverbial pillow, a tragic thing to see!

several folks have suggested using Quietex or one of the tryptophan herbal pastes to help him be happier when away from home. I'm not showing or anything, so pastes that "test" would be ok.

my guy is a semi retired 29 year old (!!) arab with more energy than sense, I'd like to make it all on easy on him as I can!!

input is welcome... thanks!

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farmbabe
Reg. Nov 2003
Posted 2011-08-08 7:02 PM (#136568 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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I have used them from time to time and they do work. Calm and cool is my personal choice. I use a half tube for trailering ( if needed)..I want them relaxed and able to stay balanced. It does take at a least 4 hours to take full effect so plan accordingly.
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ornerie
Reg. Sep 2010
Posted 2011-08-10 10:30 PM (#136622 - in reply to #136568)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?



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thank you!!
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calamityj
Reg. Jun 2005
Posted 2011-08-13 9:26 AM (#136663 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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Try using some vitamin B-1 in his feed. Quietex is used for your peace of mind, does little to calm your horse. Furthermore, Arabian horses are hard wired... if you want a cool, calm, easy horse to travel with, try a Quarter horse or a MFT. Good luck to you...
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farmbabe
Reg. Nov 2003
Posted 2011-08-13 1:29 PM (#136671 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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I would go that far. I own and show arabians. Like an breed there are some more wired than others but overall they haul and handle just fine.Its more horsemanship than breed anyway. I have used calmers on QH as well....and they do work but not every time on every horse. They are not expensive so it worth giving a try if all else has failed.
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ponytammy
Reg. Jan 2005
Posted 2011-08-13 5:27 PM (#136676 - in reply to #136663)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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Good a good laugh from the get a QH or MFT statement. Pretty broad generality considering early on with my MFT I was wanting to go back to an Arab. :) Hee hee.

I have an Arab, QH and MFTs, so I can speak to the fact that all three are well behaved (most of the time) and trailer very well. I'd say that one of my MFTs is more hard wired than some Arabs.... lots of stamina and can go the distance. I've had Arabs and QHs for a very long time and the Arabs get a bad rap most of the time. I've seen psycho horses and riders in all breeds.Just as in all breeds, bloodlines play a significant role in temperment and how easy it will be to train. Some blood lines are more "hot" than others. My MFT comes from "Hot" lines.

I prefer to ride the more hard wired "hot" MFts than the slow, dog walk temperment. I like a little action. :) Guess that is why there is type of horse for every person.

Just today saw a guy get bucked off a QH at a trail ride. I was riding with a group of gals on their Arabs and me with my MFT. Most issues are rider provoked, and lack of training on both accounts. And then a MFT went hell bent for election and ran his rider right into a low hanging tree branch. Exciting day on the trail for sure! And the Arabs were more non-chalent about the action going on around them.... women screaming at her QH and a German Shepard barking at all the riders.

My motto is 95% of horse troubles is it's the handler who has issues with communication, not the horse.

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ponytammy
Reg. Jan 2005
Posted 2011-08-13 5:32 PM (#136677 - in reply to #136676)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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As far as the calming paste, there are some herbals that offer a calming effect also. This article gives some good insight as to what you need to consider before giving a calming agent. http://holistichorse.com/Herbs/calming-herbs-for-horses.html

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calamityj
Reg. Jun 2005
Posted 2011-08-14 8:39 AM (#136689 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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Sorry girls... not baggin on any breed. Just take a jigger of my "Cowgirl mouthwash" before riding, and, when hauling add shavings in the floor of trailer and a bag of hay. Sorry for any chapped hides here...
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bbsmfg3
Reg. Dec 2006
Posted 2011-08-14 12:21 PM (#136695 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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The most calming substance know to grazers is grass. If you have it, turn him out on a lush field of grass. No artificial compounds needed.

As for wired hot horses. We raised Arabs for many years. They were as calm and well behaved as any breed. Yes, there are hot lines in just about any breed. The hottest I ever dealt with, were the show stock Saddlebreds. The few I dealt with had a loose screw. Also, had a few TWH that were as crazy as ever.
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ornerie
Reg. Sep 2010
Posted 2011-08-16 12:24 PM (#136738 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?



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thanks for all the info and suggestions (and the ones about getting a QH instead of an arab will be taken with all due consideration )

we've started on a course of ProCMC, which is basically pony peptobismal. a number of endurance pals swear by it for their arabs. Apparently, its not uncommon for performance horses to get a sour stomach from stress, which then feeds into the stress and sets everything out of wack. Rather than dulling down the overall reactions, it focusses on one of the STRESSORS and helps calm that feedback loop.

we'll see!

 

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ornerie
Reg. Sep 2010
Posted 2011-08-16 12:28 PM (#136740 - in reply to #136695)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?



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that makes sense on a ton of levels.

1. the phsycial act of grazing lowers heart rate

2. grass is full of electrolytes, and water, good for frazzled nerves

3. if we're hand grazing, we're out, looking at stuff and while I'm not really a "herdmate" I'm better than nothing ;)

4. forage is good for digestion, and helps soothe a sour stomach as well as being good for gut motility, etc.

brilliant :). I love the simple common sense stuff :)

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farmbabe
Reg. Nov 2003
Posted 2011-08-16 4:03 PM (#136742 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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You also might consider ulcers too. They are not uncommon and can be easily treated.
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ornerie
Reg. Sep 2010
Posted 2011-08-16 4:26 PM (#136743 - in reply to #136742)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?



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Originally written by farmbabe on 2011-08-16 2:03 PM

You also might consider ulcers too. They are not uncommon and can be easily treated.

 

if he responds really well to the pony pepto, thats definately something to ask the vet about... He's such a fussy old man, it wouldnt suprise me a bit, the more I read about the symptoms, etc!

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bbsmfg3
Reg. Dec 2006
Posted 2011-08-16 7:28 PM (#136747 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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Ulcers will not normally hype one up. Rather they will slow them down, reduce their appetite and make them more listless. Does he look at his stomach frequently, almost like they do when they colic. That's a common symptom of ulcers.

Peptobismal for humans is worthless on horses. If you think you may have ulcers look at U-7 from FinishLine.
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ornerie
Reg. Sep 2010
Posted 2011-08-17 3:33 PM (#136765 - in reply to #136747)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?



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Originally written by bbsmfg3 on 2011-08-16 5:28 PM

Ulcers will not normally hype one up. Rather they will slow them down, reduce their appetite and make them more listless. Does he look at his stomach frequently, almost like they do when they colic. That's a common symptom of ulcers. Peptobismal for humans is worthless on horses. If you think you may have ulcers look at U-7 from FinishLine.

 

thanks for the recommendation! the product is something called ProCMC, formulated specificially for horses. I call it pony pepto cuz it looks just like peptobismal ;). as I said, it comes highly recommended by some endurance folks I know.

we'll see what we see!

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farmbabe
Reg. Nov 2003
Posted 2011-08-21 4:08 PM (#136847 - in reply to #135667)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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Ulcers can cause horses to become anxious and nervous because they don't feel good. Like colicky horses that get sweaty and pawing...sometimes the symptoms are similar.
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laurie
Reg. Jun 2004
Posted 2011-08-26 5:59 PM (#137037 - in reply to #136663)
Subject: RE: calming pastes?


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Originally written by calamityj on 2011-08-13 9:26 AM

 Quietex is used for your peace of mind, does little to calm your horse. .

That may be your experience but not mine. It made my horse very doggy on half doses. Too lazy as a matter of fact.

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