'
1
Forums Albums Skins 1
Search Register Logon


You are logged in as a guest. Logon or register an account to access more features.
OTHER FORUMS:    Barrel Horses  -   Trucks   -   Cutting  -   Reining  -   Roping 
'
New Horse Barn Questions

Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [25 messages per page]
Last activity 2011-08-15 8:05 PM
24 replies, 10570 views

View previous thread :: View next thread
   General Discussion -> Horse Talk  Click to return to Barrel Talk
Refresh
Message format
 
docgj
Reg. Oct 2009
Posted 2011-06-15 4:43 AM (#134867)
Subject: New Horse Barn Questions


Regular


Posts: 88
252525

My wife and I are planning to build our barn in the fall. In the planning stages. What is everyones thoughts on dirt/crushed stone with rubber mats vs concrete with rubber mats? Center walkway dirt or concrete? We have dirt now without the mats very difficult to clean. Any other thoughts or suggestions on layout and things that you have found that you wish you did or didn't do or have? Wash bay? We are looking at building a 4 stall bank barn with tack room. The land layout is set up great to do the bank barn. Upper floor for hay storage. Trying to be as efficient as possible with everything to make taking care of horses as we get older.

Thanks in advance.

docgj

 

share Top of the page Bottom of the page
farmbabe
Reg. Nov 2003
Posted 2011-06-15 9:21 AM (#134871 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 1723
1000500100100
Location: michigan
I love my mats in the stalls. Makes cleaning a breeze. They were laid over packed dirt and we have never lifted to clean them yet the stalls are ok. I have mats in the alleys but that would depend on conditions. Some barns have packed dirt but if you live in a area thats wet it can get muddy. Concrete is good just making sure it stays non slippery can be a challenge. Yes to wash bays..one should be enough ( in the summer I wash and rinse outside but it would be nice to have a indoor area available when its colder). I wish we had a grooming stall so I can cross tie out of the walk way. Tack room is a must to keep things organised and clean. If you live in a area thats snowy make sure its closed up tight to avoid snow drifting in ( our mistake and we live in the cold white north) Air flow in the summer should also be addressed-being able to open doors and windows is a plus. Good lighting makes things pleasant too.
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
ponytammy
Reg. Jan 2005
Posted 2011-06-15 1:17 PM (#134877 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Elite Veteran


Posts: 781
500100100252525
Location: La Cygne, KS

Crushed stone in the stalls with the mats on top work very well. I have this set-up and the mats stay in place. One poster suggested to use rubber type caulk on the mat seams to keep urine from seeping through and stall mat curling. I haven't done that since I bed deeply, but it is a good idea.

I have a concrete aisle way and it is very easy to keep clean. I use a leaf blower to blow out hay and dirt.... works great! The concrete in the aisle way is rough, not smooth so the horses can get traction when they are on it. One thing to mention is I don't use the alley way a lot with the horses since I have paddock swing-set doors that open into paddock runs that adjoin the pasture. If you can afford it, I recommend paddock doors in each stall. This increases air flow in the hot summer time and allows your horses to come and go as they see fit. And they tend to do their business in the paddock run which is a lot easier to clean-up daily than picking through shavings. I have 12 foot over-hang on both sides of the barn. This helps keep the barn cooler too.

Insulation is needed under the roof. Do not skip this or you will get condensation in the winter and early spring and it will "rain" inside your barn.

My neighbor has concrete under his stall floors and has been fightening mold and urine ammonia issues for several years. And now they are making paddocks to increase airflow to help with the air quality.

And you can never have too many outlets. I have one at each stall for fans and heated water buckets. And several more on exterior walls and other areas of the barn.

Water spigot is located at end of the barn aisle. I wish I could have afforded stall waterers, but the water spigot with a hose works for now.

I don't like hay stored over horses in the barn for fire reasons, but I know a lot of people do it. And it seems harder to store hay in a loft situation than in a seperate building. I store just enough hay in the barn to feed the horses for a week or so, and the rest in the hay barn.

If you use concrete in your tack room, I'd have a window installed too. This is one thing I would do differently in my barn. I get mold on unused tack every summer because the concrete holds moisture. My walls are tongue and grove so the room is very tight and moisture builds up from the high humidity. A window would help a lot, so we are going to add one. For now I use those humidity closet bags to help take some of the moisture out.

Good luck with your barn, you'll love it when it is done.

share Top of the page Bottom of the page
gliderider
Reg. Nov 2009
Posted 2011-06-16 8:36 PM (#134909 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Veteran


Posts: 186
100252525
Do you know the statistics on the prevailing wind directions?  My x is a contractor and he said people to often put a building where it was "square" with something else. If his opinion was asked he pointed out sun rise & set-wind -rain-snow drift areas.  I agree where ever you live north or south put a Wood Floor or dirt floor in the tack room.  Crushed limestone is the best under mats.  Solar roof vents are great and not much more expensive than electric-- pay for themselves in no time.  You can get them with shut off switches for the winter. 
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
crowleysridgegirl
Reg. Apr 2005
Posted 2011-06-16 9:51 PM (#134911 - in reply to #134909)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 2612
2000500100

We're approximately 70% finished with a new barn that is 48'long X 36'wide with 2 14' high lean-tos on either side.one is closed on 3 sides for hay,and has a door entering a feed room.The other lean-to is open and has another door coming into a 12' wide walkway.There is a 12x12 wash bay with sink and a tack room,and 4 12x12 stalls.The 2 rooms are side by side and the ceilings/roof are floored for storage.One room is completely lined with galvanized tin.That will be the feed room.

I researched out all kinds of stall flooring material as this was probably the most important part of the barn,to me.Because of the LABOR involved in caring for stalls and what is underneath the horse's feet.I've seen some stall/barn floors that have turned out to be nothing but work nightmares to care for.We decided to go with crushed limestone,"chat" as it's known here.I called for 3/8" minus but the smallest that it is crushed in our locale is about 3/4".I made sure that the hauler knew I wanted the dust with it.That is what packs down the flooring beneath the mats when it is wetted down, and installed. I found a good website,The Rubber Man,a company that supplies mats,that has a lot of good information about stall flooring.They recommended this type of material beneath mats.When it hardens,it's almost like concrete but drains better.

 

share Top of the page Bottom of the page
gard
Reg. Aug 2007
Posted 2011-06-16 11:48 PM (#134914 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 5870
50005001001001002525
Location: western PA

When we built our barn, the center stall isle was formed with concrete. Before it hardened, I broomed the surface, lighly roughening things and reducing it's slipperiness. We've been in many barns with dirt isles, some covered with mats, some left bare. One we visited is even built with plank flooring which has become impossibly slippery when wet. The concrete, for us, has been much better. It's easier to keep clean, has a higher reflectivity, does not soften when wet, needs no releveling or maintenance.

When the horses are shod, the errant clipped nails are easy to spot. Farriers and vets enjoy the hard and level work surfaces. Installing the concrete was a decision we have never regretted. If a vapour barrier is installed before the pour, moisture will not appear through the concrete, which is hygroscopic by nature. Our floor was formed using 2X6's which resulted in a 5 1/2" pad. This is strong enough to drive vehicles on, without any apparent damage over several decades of use.

There are many types of fill that can be used under stall rubber matting. Drainage is important, The mats greatly reduce the mucking times and are recommended.

share Top of the page Bottom of the page
apricotbend
Reg. Oct 2003
Posted 2011-06-17 10:42 AM (#134920 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Regular


Posts: 63
2525
Location: Eagle, Idaho
Give consideration to the type of insulation under the roof of your new barn. We put in the nice standard fiberglass insulation with the white attached plastic liner below it. This worked great until the starlings moved in and proceded to destroy the insulation. Those birds tore out HUGE chunks and built nests that they tunneled into. We ended up covering the insulation with sheet rock--not ideal but it was a quick fix. I would consider putting up some kind of thin insulation like the e-foil (not sure that's the name) or a thin sprayed on type that won't support nests. Perhaps others on this forum can recommend something that works well and won't allow birds to destroy it.
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
AJH
Reg. Nov 2010
Posted 2011-06-17 12:35 PM (#134924 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Member


Posts: 39
25
Location: Southwestern, Indiana
The information given so far has been spot on with our experience. We have been in our barn for 4 years and have never regretted building it. Our barn is 36 x 60 and has 12' wide by 14' tall lean to's on each side. (Make them 16' wide if you can) We have 4 stalls along the one wall with individual dutch doors out to the dry lot area so our horses can come and go as they please. The dutch doors make it nice when the vet and farrier come with keeping the horses in the barn while they wait their turn without totally closing them in. We went with 4-6" crushed and compacted limestone under the interlocking rubber mats. Well worth the money. Our neighbor has the Tractor Supply mats over dirt and their stlls are a pain to muck compared to ours, due to the unlevelness and overlapped edges. Our aislway is 14' wide (20' would be nice) and 14' tall. I keep dreaming of the day when I will finally get the aisleway concreted, it is dirt and that leads to a lot of dust on everything. The wife wants to put the rubber tile pavers over the concrete but I think that is overkill. We have a loft over about half the barn, other than getting the hay up there it has worked well. The area above the horses is open so that gives more room for the heat to escape from them. The builders used the foil vapor barrier under the metal roof and that has been the one mistake. It was coming down within the first year from the lean to's so we had a metal ceiling put in them. The builder did help us out on the cost of that. Now we need to talk to him about the inside and see if he is still helpful! Hopefully this winter I will finally build out the wash room, tack room and the other 2 stalls on the other side of the aisleway. The best thing we did was visit as many barns (large to small and cheap to expensive) as we could for ideas. Good luck with your barn.
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
crowleysridgegirl
Reg. Apr 2005
Posted 2011-06-18 6:58 AM (#134931 - in reply to #134914)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 2612
2000500100
Gard,would you advise that we seal off our concrete floors in our barn? Our contractor believes it will cause them to be slick.They were finished with the light broom finish you talked about also.
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
crowleysridgegirl
Reg. Apr 2005
Posted 2011-06-18 7:04 AM (#134932 - in reply to #134877)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 2612
2000500100
our tack room sounds a lot like Ponytammy's.I don't think a window would be practical for us because:this is sided by the hay lean-to and,hay would probably wind up stacked in front of it.Also it would be easy to break into without stall-type bars,which I've actually seen done.The dehumidifer idea is good.I don't plan on keeping my saddles in the barn,husband does tho.(his,I mean.)
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
gard
Reg. Aug 2007
Posted 2011-06-18 12:40 PM (#134938 - in reply to #134931)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 5870
50005001001001002525
Location: western PA

 

Originally written by crowleysridgegirl on 2011-06-18 7:58 AM

Gard,would you advise that we seal off our concrete floors in our barn? Our contractor believes it will cause them to be slick.They were finished with the light broom finish you talked about also.

CRG. It will take a while for your new concrete to fully harden and dry out. I would try it as is for a while and see what happens. A lot depends on your topography, weather, usage etc., as to how much it might sweat. You can always seal later, if you feel it needs so.

The easiest way to prevent this moisture, is to install a vapour barrier under the concrete before it is poured. It is put down first, then the mesh and rebar, then the concrete is poured, covering everything.

Enjoy your new barn!

share Top of the page Bottom of the page
crowleysridgegirl
Reg. Apr 2005
Posted 2011-06-19 11:50 AM (#134959 - in reply to #134938)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 2612
2000500100

Thanks,Gard.

Our contractor did all that you mentioned before the concrete was poured.vapor barrier,grid,etc.I was thinking about sealing the concrete off mostly to prevent staining like what has occurred in my garage and driveway,(impossible to remove once it is there.) I wanted to prevent that same thing from happening at least,in the new barn floor.

share Top of the page Bottom of the page
gard
Reg. Aug 2007
Posted 2011-06-19 9:39 PM (#134978 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 5870
50005001001001002525
Location: western PA
http://www.superfloorcoat.com/commercial.asp?gclid=CKvKnvy5w6kCFcTd4AodIxXFOw
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
crowleysridgegirl
Reg. Apr 2005
Posted 2011-06-20 9:38 AM (#134991 - in reply to #134978)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 2612
2000500100
Thanks Gard for the link.I can see that it's not going to be an inexpensive endeavor to undertake.
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
gard
Reg. Aug 2007
Posted 2011-06-20 10:38 AM (#134995 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 5870
50005001001001002525
Location: western PA
We've never sealed our floor. We even park one of the Kubotas at one end, and we have had no stains that can't be cleaned up with a water hose. Having said that, we do have a spot where hoof black was tipped over. A new barn is like a new car. Until the first scratch appears, you will usually be over protective. It's a BARN, not your living room, even though it probably cost more.
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
crowleysridgegirl
Reg. Apr 2005
Posted 2011-06-21 10:32 AM (#135010 - in reply to #134995)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 2612
2000500100
well,you'd be surprised.I know we were.By the way,the guys at that website that you recommended are very nice and helpful.It might not be worth more than the time,labor,and money to seal the floors off,but,I know that I wish a thousand times I'd sealed off our garage flooring and driveway.Rust stains,oil stains,unknown stains,etc.We'll sure probably spend at least half as much of our time in this barn! Don already appropriated a handmade cedar log/cowhide bench on Father's Day for the pass-through.I'd like it in the house,myself!
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
Are we there yet
Reg. Jan 2011
Posted 2011-06-22 11:35 AM (#135045 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: Insulation


Member


Posts: 20

Location: Woodland, Wa
We had the same experience with insulation as apricot bend. Boy, what a mess those birds can cause. We finally went to Home Depot and bought the hard plastic/fiberglass sheets (4x6) used to line shower walls, along with the strips that join the sheets together. Works like a charm. We also used the same sheets to line the walls in our wash rack. Waterproof, and bird proof. YIPEEE! As for our stalls we tamped down the existing dirt and layed down our mats. After 14 yrs the mats are just now starting to curl at the corners a bit. I think later this summer we will pull the mats (ugh) and put 3/8 minus..finally.
Good luck with your new barn, you will love it.!
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
crowleysridgegirl
Reg. Apr 2005
Posted 2011-06-22 2:05 PM (#135047 - in reply to #135045)
Subject: RE: Insulation


Expert


Posts: 2612
2000500100
spent about 2 hours last PM additional to the workmen earlier in the day,bringing in some additional roadbase and leveling out some low spots and wetting it down,then,tamped it with a garden rake with the short metal tines,we didn't have one of those things that you use to tamp down the rock with,so,had to make do with whatever.What a chore! I said,I'd rather do it now than have to do it over again!
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
PaulChristenson
Reg. Jan 2007
Posted 2011-06-23 10:37 PM (#135090 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Expert


Posts: 3853
200010005001001001002525
Location: Vermont
Originally written by docgj on 2011-06-15 4:43 AM

My wife and I are planning to build our barn in the fall. In the planning stages. What is everyones thoughts on dirt/crushed stone with rubber mats vs concrete with rubber mats? Center walkway dirt or concrete? We have dirt now without the mats very difficult to clean. Any other thoughts or suggestions on layout and things that you have found that you wish you did or didn't do or have? Wash bay? We are looking at building a 4 stall bank barn with tack room. The land layout is set up great to do the bank barn. Upper floor for hay storage. Trying to be as efficient as possible with everything to make taking care of horses as we get older.

Thanks in advance.

docgj

 



If you are along the east coast...give these guys a call...they do good work... http://www.horizonstructures.com/
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
randemtam
Reg. Jun 2007
Posted 2011-06-25 7:48 PM (#135131 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Extreme Veteran


Posts: 434
10010010010025
Location: Brooksville, Fl
We have concrete in our stalls with rubber mats. Love it and would not want it any other way. I absolutely hate filling in holes in a stall. We Slightly crowned the floor from the middle of the aisle to the walls. We have doors that open to runs and everything just gravitates there. Occasionally we pressure wash the stalls and the water just runs off and dries.
Good luck with your new barn!
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
Penejoe
Reg. Oct 2006
Posted 2011-07-03 8:12 AM (#135351 - in reply to #135131)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Regular


Posts: 51
2525
Location: Edwards Ms
We have a 36x48 that we built a few years ago ,actually a work in progress if you know what I mean. We added a 12x40 lean to for hay and still working on my tack room. Open in the middle with 3 stalls on one side and 2 on the other. I am very proud of the work we did only cost was material had a lot of help from friends and neighbors. My only regret is that we did not put anything under the roof to allow for condensation???? So in the fall and winter when the sun hits the roof it of course rains inside my barn. We were gonna try and add a vapor barrior under the tin BUT my question to you guys is would you take the roof off and install it on top of the pearlins or could I just put it between the 2x6 framing?
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
docgj
Reg. Oct 2009
Posted 2011-07-06 12:27 AM (#135404 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Regular


Posts: 88
252525

Penejoe,

The way to do it correctly is to remove the steel and put it over the purlins. The only issue is that you will need to put the screws(New Ones) back in the same holes in the steel that they came out of or you will have more leaks than when you started.

docgj

share Top of the page Bottom of the page
Penejoe
Reg. Oct 2006
Posted 2011-07-06 9:23 AM (#135412 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Regular


Posts: 51
2525
Location: Edwards Ms
yea thats what we've been telling ourselve I was just dreading havn to do it!!
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
calamityj
Reg. Jun 2005
Posted 2011-07-07 7:11 AM (#135429 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


Elite Veteran


Posts: 688
500100252525
Location: missouri
You have so many options ! We used concrete in the aisle (sweeped & peagravel in the concrete) so that it is not slick. We also built a "porch" on the frontside, with hitching posts on each side... that way, the farrier has a solid and level surface to work on... and, it is out of the weather. We probably built ours larger than we needed to... Our only regret is that we didn't build a horsebarn/ house instead of sinking 200k> on a house to keep up... Draw up lots of layouts and pick the best. Good luck. I hope we get another opportunity in the next couple of years...
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
riverviewfarm
Reg. Aug 2011
Posted 2011-08-15 8:05 PM (#136726 - in reply to #134867)
Subject: RE: New Horse Barn Questions


New User


Posts: 4

Location: NJ
The lifesaver for us was a sacrifice area that has direct access from the stalls. It is approx 60 X 100. It is pitched away from the barn, then landscape fabric then 3/4" quarry processed, then limestone screenings. No mud....we live in the northeast and need a place for them to be turned out in yucky weather and they aren't locked in their stalls. It keeps the stalls cleaner because they go outside to poop. We can also open the gate and they have direct access to pasture and can come and go as they please in nice weather. It is also easier in the winter when we have alot of snow...we take the tractor with a front loader bucket and clean out the snow. Manure is easy to clean in the summer and winter. I love it.....
share Top of the page Bottom of the page
Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [25 messages per page]
Jump to forum :
Search this forum
Printer friendly version
E-mail a link to this thread
Message format
 

'
Registered to: Horse Trailer World
(Delete all cookies set by this site)