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Horse Trainer Trailering Insurance

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Last activity 2018-09-22 6:17 AM
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MrsMcG353
Posted 2018-09-01 10:03 PM (#171854)
Subject: Horse Trainer Trailering Insurance


New User


Posts: 1

Who to call?

Traditionally I have hauled with a dually pick up and a 4 horse Featherlite (no LQ). I am purchasing a 6 horse Bloomer with LQ and intend to haul it long term with a full size semi truck (would like to find one with a sleeper and dinette). I carry full care/custody/control and liability for my training business and it covers me (if I understand my policy correctly) when I am hauling and on the road at shows. However, with most likely stepping up to get a CDL with all the requirements coming down the pipeline, can anyone tell me what would be the "correct" level of insurance to carry and the most effective and cost efficient carriers are? I have always just insured my truck and trailer on our personal policy through our farm bureau, but they won't touch us if its a commercial vehicle.
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loveduffy
Posted 2018-09-12 10:31 PM (#171863 - in reply to #171854)
Subject: RE: Horse Trainer Trailering Insurance



Expert


Posts: 1859
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Location: NY
If you are doing buessness with your trailer and truck you need to look at a insurence that will cover liabity for you hauling other poeple,s horses farm family may do that   
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HOUSE
Posted 2018-09-15 11:50 PM (#171866 - in reply to #171854)
Subject: RE: Horse Trainer Trailering Insurance


Veteran


Posts: 125
10025
Location: riverside ca
It varies by state that you live in, first I am going to assume you are not hauling for hire.  before you buy a truck you should be aware that it is possible in some states to register a class 8 truck as a motorhome, if you do this it will make your life much easier when you go to insure it.  you will still have to find an insurer that is willing to  insure it but it is much easier to convince them that it is not a truck for hauling commercially.  If you dont find a truck that has had its title changed to RV, or change it to RV in your state all is not lost, the main thing to remember is that most of the people that insure class 8 trucks for recreational use are used to dealing with RVs.  with that in mind make sure that you communicate that you have a caming trailer that can haul horses rather than a horse trailer that you can live in.  it sounds silly but from an underwriting standpoint it is a huge difference.  I personally use GMAC/Camping world/National General(same company). 
Once you get insurance realize that you need to learn what DOT thinks is a commercial vehicle, vs what makes sense for what a commercial vehicle is.  life will be much easier.  

for most people who haul a decent sized trailer the HDT is the way to go
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PaulChristenson
Posted 2018-09-22 6:00 AM (#171879 - in reply to #171854)
Subject: RE: Horse Trainer Trailering Insurance


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Posts: 3833
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Location: Vermont
 
 
A couple of things to consider...

GCVW of 10,001 or more must display U.S. DOT Number
If you are a commercial carrier operating a vehicle or combination with a weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more, you are required to obtain a U.S. DOT number and properly display that number, along with some other information, on your vehicle.

“For Hire”
If you haul for hire or transport horses interstate as a business, you are required to obtain a motor carrier number from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. This requirement is independent of the USDOT number requirement. There is a one-time fee of $300 for this number.


Forming Your Business 
The first step when establishing your equine transportation business is to determine whether you will operate as a SOLE PROPRIETORSHIP, limited liability company (LLC), corporation, or partnership. There are tax and liability advantages associated with each type of business, so you should consult an advisor to see what will work best for your business.
 
You will also need to look into acquiring permits, licenses, special liability insurance policies, or any other documentation required by city, state, or local regulatory agencies.

Create a Shipping Contract 
Equine transporters should have a standard contract that the horse owner must sign before a horse is shipped. It is advisable to have an attorney draw up your contract.  You should also try to obtain other transport provider contracts from competitors to see what specific areas should be addressed. Contracts usually outline terms of service in great detail (including pickup and drop off locations, total distance to be traveled, the cost of transportation, and any liability or insurance concerns).
 
Owners are also required to provide documentation that horses are up to date on all necessary vaccinations and tests (including a current Coggins test to allow interstate travel).
 

Edited by PaulChristenson 2018-09-22 6:09 AM
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PaulChristenson
Posted 2018-09-22 6:17 AM (#171880 - in reply to #171854)
Subject: RE: Horse Trainer Trailering Insurance


Expert


Posts: 3833
2000100050010010010025
Location: Vermont
Your insurance has lots of issues to consider as well...

Livestock Hauling Risks
  • Escaped Livestock- If your trailer tips over during an accident your livestock might escape and cause other accidents on the road. Recapturing the animals can be a big and costly challenge too.
  • Death or Crippling- Many things can happen while hauling a load that can result in the mortality or injuring of the livestock. From accidents to heat, to issues loading, sometimes the animals will die or become crippled.
Livestock Cargo Insurance Coverages
Selecting the right coverages for your policy not only safeguards your livelihood, it also reduces your premium. If you haul horses there are unique risks that you face that demand specialized cargo coverage with that in mind. Some common livestock transport insurance coverages include:
  • Livestock Transit Coverage (Broad) – This coverage pays for livestock killed or crippled during a run. It covers you regardless of how the livestock was hurt.
  • Livestock Transit Coverage (Limited) – This coverage pays for livestock killed or crippled during a run but only covers you in circumstances that you choose.
  • Additional Property Coverage – Trailers can haul non-living cargo, too. This coverage insures any cargo you haul other than livestock.
  • Carcass Removal – This policy feature pays for the expense to remove any dead animal from your trailer.
  • Coverage after Transit – This coverage is similar to livestock transit coverage but insures the livestock after it’s been unloaded.
 
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